Ardbeg Supernova 2. Where is the love?

I sit down. It had been a hard day at work and I quite fancied a wee dram. I saw Lucas had raved about the New Supernova. Was I gonna try it? You bet! But I was apprehensive. Was a cask strength peat sandwich likely to relax me or get me more wound up? I guess the only way with these kind of decisions is to jump in and get involved.

Nose: I ordered a dram and took a deep breath of fresh air, followed by a deep breath of peat. It was literally like shoving my head in a peat bog on Islay (ok I haven’t exactly done that, but I think it is as close as I am going to get to it). Could I get past the peat to the sweet Ardbeg house style? That is the sad part for me. With the mountains of peat used and the sheer volume of alcohol, I couldn’t. Ardbegs light, clean, apple and zesty spirit had been overpowered by this peat monster. Instead all I got was a sheer wave of coal fires, peat bogs and the sad remnants of a barbeque.

With Water: Please don’t add water to this. It really isn’t a good idea. I am actually going to buy another dram to test this, because I couldn’t believe how off the nose went with water. The peat bog turned into a muddy mire

Palate: A massive impact of smoke, peat, earth and a bit of burnt bbq embers,  followed by a feeling of disappointment. It is such a blunt instrument, I  couldn’t enjoy it.

When it comes to smoky whiskies, I enjoy the BBQ notes, or sweetness or oiliness that go with the smoke. These little complexities make Ardbeg 10, Uigeadail, Lagavullin 16, Laphroaig Quarter cask, Bowmore Tempest, Bunnahabhain Toichtech (I could go on) excellent whiskies. I just couldn’t get my head round the Supernova.

Overall: Arbeg collectors should buy this whisky and already have in their droves. Everyone else, try it at a bar first. It definitely splits opinion.

Chris