Glenturret Brock Malloy Edition

Glenturret Distillery

A single cask. How totally individual. How utterly unrepeatable. How completely unique. I love sampling them. Don’t get me wrong, multi-cask vattings from distilleries form the bulk of my all time top single malts – Ardbeg Uigeadail, Glenfiddich 15yo Solera Reserve, Aberlour a’bunadh, Highland Park 18yo, Lagavulin 16yo etc. The list could (and definitely does) go on. But there’s something so very special about tasting the liquid from a single cask, whether it be a cheeky sample in the warehouse at the end of a distillery tour, whether it’s a cracker from The Scotch Malt Whisky Society’s most recent outturn, or whether it’s a style of whisky which turns a distillery’s style entirely on its head.

The most recent single cask bottling which has really grabbed my attention is The Brock Malloy Edition from Glenturret. This 28yo single cask release takes its name from the two stillmen who worked at Glenturret on the date the cask was filled, December 16th 1986; Hugh Malloy and Chic Brock. From the outset, I like the name of the release, mainly because (and I’ve said this before) the people behind the whisky can sometimes be forgotten. Shop shelves are filled with fancy packaging and the web is full of clever marketing and advertising campaigns, so the people who actually make the bloody stuff get pushed to the side. Nice touch, but what’s the liquid like?

Glenturret Brock Malloy Edition
1986 28yo Single Cask
240 bottles only
47.1% ABV
£200 here

Nose: Some marshmallows, pink wafers and dusty peardrops on top. Then stewed fruits, namely rhubarb and apple, which gives way to nutmeg, cedar wood, pencil shavings and polished wood. A touch of cacao, tobacco and tea leaf too, but they’re very faint. Rich but soft.

Palate: The sweetness of juicy fruit chewing gum and some fruit salad hit first. Following on there’s cinder toffee, manuka honey, and a real sweet nuttiness, before milk chocolate, pencil and charred oak come through. Silky and smooth, but rich and spicy at the same time – really well balanced.

Finish: Toffee, chocolate and rich honey are dominant. Then the juicy oak comes through.

Overall: Not to be rushed. Put it this way: when this whisky was distilled I was small bunch of cells barely resembling a peanut, let alone a person. And it’s taken me nearly 28 years to develop into something remotely human (to be honest, I’m not sure Turbo will ever get there…). This well balanced whisky is really rewarding given sufficient time – it has enough balls to really pack a punch but it does it with a gentlemanly grace. Roger Federer at his peak, if you will.

Tiger

 

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