Glendronach Cask Strength Batch 7

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Following on from the furore regarding the extraordinary price hike of Aberlour a’bunadh, it seems only fitting, and quite timely, that I review a brand new whisky from one of a’bunadh’s closest competitors. Glendronach Cask Strength Batch 7 consists of whisky matured in Pedro Ximinex and Oloroso sherry casks which is then married together before being bottled at natural cask strength, non-chill filtered, at natural colour, and without an age statement.

Glendronach Master Blender, Rachel Barrie, commented on the release: “The Glendronach Cask Strength Batch 7 is rich in the rewards of slow, mellow and complex sherry cask maturation in the earthen-floored dunnage warehouses at Glendronach; the rewards being a sublime aroma, rounded taste, full body and long-lasting finish. With a cask selection spanning Summer, Autumn and Winter distillation at Glendronach, the resulting marriage delivers a malt with a strong heart, complex taste and smooth mellow maturity, belying it’s 57.9% cask strength. The Glendronach Cask Strength Batch 7 continues our tradition of marrying the finest Spanish oak sherry casks with our robust Highland malt.”

Here goes…

Glendronach Cask Strength
Batch 7
PX & Oloroso Sherry Casks
57.9% ABV
£59.95 here

Nose: Vanilla fudge, caramel wafers, Millionaire’s Shortbread, and cinder toffee give this a very sweet start. Then some honey on toast, orange marmalade, malt loaf, sultanas and peanut brittle come through. Earthy, oaky undertones pervade.

Palate: More fruity than the nose suggested, with plum jam, apricots, fig rolls, and faint prune. Then some lavender honey, Danish pastries, glazed walnuts, and black tea, before leather, clove and cinnamon surge through.

Finish: Morello cherries, earthy wood spices, some cask stave and dark chocolate.

Overall: God, I just love naked Glendronach. It’s not as much of a ‘sherry monster’ as previous batches, which might take it down a notch in some people’s books, but I think it makes for a more balanced dram overall. Sure, the dried fruits and spicy, oaky notes are there, but they’re not the only things present. The caramel sweetness, juicy fruits and nutty earthiness add an extra layer, making this a lovely intriguing dram, and at a rather generous 57.9% your 60 quid goes quite a long way.

 

 

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