Glenglassaugh Octaves Batch 2

Glenglassaugh Octaves Header

Are octaves en vogue at the moment? Duncan Taylor have added new expressions to their Octave Collection, AD Rattray have started their Octave Project, and now Glenglassaugh have released the second batch of their Octave range. Unfamiliar with octaves? They’re essentially tiny little 65-ish litre casks, which allow for rapid maturation due to the increased surface area of oak compared to the relatively small volume of whisky.

Glenglassaugh Octaves Classic consists of whisky matured in bourbon, pedro ximénez and amontillado octaves, whereas Glenglassaugh Octaves Peated consists of peated whisky matured in bourbon, port and oloroso octaves.

Commenting on their release, Glenglassaugh Master Blender, Rachel Barrie, said: “As the surf rolls in on Sandend Bay and invigorating North Sea air passes through our coastal warehouses, these two luscious malts are truly a distillation of nature’s elements. Shaped by the rich abundance of land and sea, this fresh duo of Glenglassaugh Octaves encapsulate rolling waves of flavour that intensify and evolve with each and every sip.”

Let’s see.

Glenglassaugh Octaves Classic
Batch 2
Bourbon, PX & Amontillado Octaves
44% ABV
£60 RRP

Nose: Very bright, with lemon rind, pink wafers, candyfloss, peaches in syrup, mango and lychee. Sawdust too, and a little salted nut mix.

Palate: Clean and citrusy – grapefruit, kiwi and lime. Then red currant and cherry undertones with charred oak, cinnamon swirls and spiced pears.

Finish: Lingering woodspices, dark chocolate and liquorice.

Glenglassaugh Octaves Peated
Batch 2
Bourbon, Port & Oloroso Octaves
44% ABV
£65 RRP

Nose: Beach bonfire, charred steak, leather, toasted raisins and singed orange peel. There’s a coastal element too with BBQ’d prawns and oyster shells.

Palate: Smoked lemon, BBQ’d seafood, embers, rolling woodsmoke, rich toffee, manuka honey, cask stave and a cracked black pepper spice.

Finish: The woodsmoke dominates, with espresso and dried fruit.

Overall: Two very enjoyable, and very different, whiskies. The wood hasn’t dominated in either case, allowing the coastal notes to shine alongside the rich fruit and spice notes derived from the octaves. Both whiskies are nicely balanced and rather well integrated despite their undoubtedly young age. They may be quite straight forward whiskies, but there’s certainly enough there to make you want to pour another dram to investigate further. Good stuff.

 

Leave a Reply


Anti-Spam Protection by WP-SpamFree